May 27, 2011

The Reef Krakoff Story

Last month's New Yorker has a great story on the story of how designer Reef Krakoff began his career at Coach (after working at Ralph Lauren and Tommy Hilfiger), and the story behind his newish eponymous line.
Coach has been a top-ranked accessories brand in the United States for more than a decade. Thirty-six per cent of the premium handbags sold in this country have a Coach label on them.
"Frankly, I go into one of the stores now and I don't see one bag that I like" - Miles Cahn, the founder of Coach
Read the full story on newyorker.com.

March 23, 2011

Anna in WSJ. Magazine

She's been editor of the American edition of Vogue since 1988, and by now it has become commonplace to call her the most powerful woman in fashion. But her influence is much broader than it appears in her fun-house-mirror caricature: a brittle despot in round Chanel sunglasses who rules the world around her through impeccable taste, terror and sarcasm. It is hidden within an intricate web of powerful friends and allies, many of whom she's worked with for decades. That web spans the U.S., out to Hollywood, down to Washington, and across both oceans. Imperious as she may appear, she's really more impresario than empress.

The unusual part, say her intimates, is that there's never a direct quid pro quo. On the other hand, if Wintour does ask for something, there aren't two possible answers. "If I get a request for something I don't want to do," says Marc Jacobs, "first I get an email, then a phone call from someone at Vogue, and now I don't even bother to say no—I know the next call is from her."

"With all the new media outlets out there, with all the noise, a voice of authority and calm like Vogue becomes more important than ever. The more eyes on fashion, the more opinions about fashion, the more exploration of fashion around the world, the better it is for Vogue. Vogue is like Nike or Coca-Cola—this huge global brand. I want to enhance it, I want to protect it, and I want it to be part of the conversation."
 

March 10, 2011

Trends Trends Trends

Read about my favorite Milan Fashion Week trends on Front Row Mag!

March 1, 2011

Sometimes, it's in the details

I'm not sure if I love everything in the Fall Dolce & Gabbana collection - it feels at times like a discombobulated mash up between menswear-inspired tailoring and sexy dresses. But I do love the details - the fun sequined accessories and chic leather bags.

February 20, 2011

Yigal Azrouel Fall 2011: What I Want To Wear Right Now

Young, preppy, fresh silhouettes in bold colors. Softened through furs, knits and layering. Masculine without being too structured.



February 19, 2011

Last Summer: Rodarte in Venice

I had to hand-carry this Rodarte look from a car onto the Venice Beach boardwalk...hence...very lovely. Although I'd have to say it looked a lot better on Lindsey Wixson than it did on the street.

February 12, 2011

Reading Material: What Happens Next

A very interesting interview on Style.com with Carine Roitfeld a week after she left French Vogue. 

ON FREELANCING
It’s strange for me to come back here to New York during the fashion show season and not to be the editor in chief of French Vogue. Of course, I’ve done it before when I was just a freelancer, but ten years is a long time. It’s like 20 times I came here for the shows, and suddenly I’m not the editor in chief. That’s a custom, so it’s hard to now be a freelance editor. But it’s exciting, too.
[For the last ten years] I didn’t have a lot of time to think about the big picture or how fashion is going to be in some years. Now it’s a good moment for me to think about fashion for today, because a lot of things have changed, and when you’re working you don’t see all these things changing. But when you stop, you can see it. You have to understand the new way of working with fashion.
 ON STREET FASHION
...it’s true that, when you go to a show now, the photographers are more interested sometimes in the dress or the jacket you’re wearing than to photograph the show, and I think this is totally wrong. It’s an honor and you smile to the people. But is it normal? I think there is something a bit weird, that more people want to see these looks than want to see what John Galliano or Dolce & Gabbana did for the show.
 ON MAGAZINES
In general terms, do you see a positive future for magazines?
I think it will be very difficult for a lot of magazines, because now you see so many things on the Internet right away and you cannot be as quick as the Internet. Maybe some magazines will stay, but they have to be very beautiful, like collector’s items…Today we have to think differently. [Take] globalization. Ten years ago we never thought we were going to have a Vogue in China, and it’s one of the most successful Vogues, so if you’re not moving, you’re dead. Maybe it’s about going to other countries, to find another way to be interesting in fashion, to talk to a wider audience.
THE INTERNET
Any interest in working on the Internet?
I’m not an Internet [girl]. I’m not writing on blogs. I’m not a Facebook girl. Even though there is a fake Facebook with my name, it’s not me. I’m not on Twitter, it’s not me. But I think if I’m not going on the Internet, I’m going to totally disappear, because the future is the Internet. It’s very difficult for me to work on the Internet, but maybe I will find a way. I think this is very, very important.
GOLDEN HANDCUFFS
People say, “Why did you leave French Vogue? It’s crazy.” But I say, I always liked challenge. When Tom Ford asked me to consult for Gucci, I had never consulted in my life. I didn’t know what consulting was, and look, we made something amazing. I have a lot of ideas coming, and it’s more exciting than getting older in your golden cage.
Read the full article here.

February 10, 2011

And so it begins...

Snapshot: NYFW Fall 2011 collections. Gary Graham. Tribeca. February 9, 2011.

February 2, 2011

Lanvin Jewelry

How stunning is this Spring Lanvin collar necklace that I ran across this weekend? They make the best jewelry, and beautifully crafted to boot.

January 20, 2011

Repeating the obvious. But it's a point worth repeating.

Ironic that while work experience has never been more important, it has also never been more impossible to sustain, particularly in London. Only the wealthy can afford to do unpaid work when there are bills to pay, so increasingly only the wealthy seem to end up doing work experience. Certainly I have noticed this in the fashion industry: I realise I'm not the first to point out that an internship on a glossy magazine has become like some sort of finishing school for the posh. 

Even among the less wealthy, students still have to rely on the bank of mum and dad to finance their internships, placing more pressure on parents already cash-strapped from funding three years' worth of university education. As usual, the poorest and least supported suffer, unable to prove their worth, however high it might be.
 From the fashion editor of the London Evening Standard.

January 18, 2011

The end of an era? Tao Comme Des Garcons Label to End

WWD reports today that the Spring Summer 2011 collection will be the last one for this Comme des Garcons brand, Tao. I've requested it a bit for shoots, but it's pretty conceptual and hard for the average woman to wear, so I can understand why in this age of red carpet appearances and celebrity endorsements, they might decide to close it. It's not every designer that can show a collection inspired by Miss Honey, the drag queen! Tao Kurihara, we look forward to seeing what you will be up to next!

January 17, 2011

Stylist Mel Ottenberg Interviewed by Style.com

“Style,” as Jean Cocteau said, “is a simple way of saying complicated things.” And so it might be said that stylist Mel Ottenberg’s job is to find that simple way of saying something complicated. A button undone, a cuff rolled just so, the particular way a particular belt is slung over a particular dress: A good stylist makes these kinds of choices seem inevitable, and uses them to impart heaps of information about fashion, about the vibe on the street and the mood of the nation, and about how to look, now. “You’re kind of a medium,” explains Ottenberg...“You’re doing your own appropriation of this ‘thing,’ that’s how you bring the style into it. That’s hard to talk about, and it’s pretty much subliminal,” he adds. “I don’t want the style to be noticed, per se. I just want the kid who’s reading the magazine to think, wow, that looks great.”
"...styling is one of those careers where you’re kind of struggling until one day, you aren’t. [...] There was this constant feeling of, OK, maybe now everything gets easier. But it didn’t, not for a while. In retrospect, I think that’s good—I had a lot of opportunities to try things out, make a few mistakes, and so by the time some really high-stakes gigs came along, I was ready for them."
I have a feeling I'm going to like this new series from Style.com's Style File blog, Behind the Scenesters. Low key yet so informative and interesting. Can't wait to see more!

Read the full interview HERE.

January 14, 2011

Ah, Canadian Magazines

"Just as traditional movie stardom is threatened by the reality meteors, so will the rarefied air of Wintour grow too thin to sustain life." 
I have many issues with this article by National Post writer Leanne Delap, former editor of Fashion, currently Canada's largest fashion magazine. But her main point that I imagine she is making with the article is that magazine editors are becoming more personable and available, which is true. 

I disagree strongly when she writes "being a bitch is so last season," however, because I don't think that it is fair of Delap to imply that editors like Vreeland and Wintour (who is referenced at length in the article) were about "being a bitch." Being firm and mysterious and demanding of your staff is not necessarily a bad thing, accessible or not.

Read the full article here, and let me know what you think.

Orange Crush: Backstage at Karen Walker's Spring 2011 Show

Loving all this orange, and the happy models!

Walt Disney Signature by Noir Jewelry

I never thought I would want a Disney-branded product. Ever. But this Noir Jewelry designed bracelet (inspired by the cartoon classic Fantasia) for Walt Disney Signature is pretty amazing. [Note: I'm wearing it upside down because it fits my wrists better that way.]

Definitely a splurge, but if you're interested you can buy it online here!

January 8, 2011

Happy New Year!

Easter Island snapshots, 2011.
Sometimes, it's nice to get away. Far, far away.